Colour Options

Picking A Colour
We use Farrow & Ball's Estate Eggshell paint to give your furniture the perfect finish. You can choose any colour from the options below, make a note of the name and then type in the box where prompted on the product page. We can also apply any brand of paint so please contact us to see if there are any additional charges. If you are not 100% sure just yet on your colour choice, don't worry, Just Type TBC in the box on the product page

ALL WHITE

Farrow & Ball's cleanest and whitest white - it will bring a freshness to any colour. White & Light Tones.

WIMBORNE WHITE

Named after the historic Dorset town in which John Farrow & Richard Ball founded Farrow & Ball.

POINTING

Named after the colour of lime pointing used in traditional brickwork.

JAMES WHITE

A soothing but fresh off-white with underlying green.

CLUNCH

As in the chalk stone building blocks used in East Anglia. A very versatile off-white.

SHADED WHITE

Just darker than Off-White and lighter than Old White. This can also be used as a light 'drab' colour.

WHITE TIE

The white of old, pre-brightened, starched cotton.

NEW WHITE

Lighter and warmer than the much used Off-White. An ideal white for use with some of the brighter colours.

MATCHSTICK

Mostly used as a warm wall colour with lighter, cooler woodwork and ceiling whites.

STRING

A pale earth pigment based colour can be used either as an off-white with brighter colours or as its own colour with a brighter white.

SAVAGE GROUND

A wallpaper ground colour favoured by Dennis Savage, a block printer par excellence.

CORD

A lively warm colour to put with natural materials.

TALLOW

A light off-white with a yellow tint.

RINGWOLD GROUND

Similar to Off-White but with greater warmth.

HOUSE WHITE

A light yellowed off-white.

FARROWS CREAM

Farrow & Ball's original cream.

CREAM

A classic colour based only on the addition of yellow ochre and in this case a little lamp black.

CATS PAW

Stronger in colour than its counterparts String and Cord, this is a good yellow-based neutral. Try alongside darker reds and warm blues.

DIMITY

Most used as a wall colour in its own right with All White or Pointing on woodwork and ceilings.

JOAS WHITE

For devotees of Off-White, this colour though just darker, has none of the coolness or perceived greenish nature of Off-White.

ARCHIVE

this colour would normally be seen as a buff and not an off-white

OXFORD STONE

The perfect combination with London Stone for a warm interior.

LONDON STONE

John Sutcliffe's colour taken from a Nash house in Regent's Park.

SMOKED TROUT

A paler, less coloured version of Dead Salmon.

SLIPPER SATIN

A very successful off-white for woodwork with strong colours or as a wall colour used with many of the other whites, both lighter and darker.

LIME WHITE

The colour of untinted brightest white limewash or soft distemper.

OFF-WHITE

Paler than Old White with which it could be used as a picking-out colour.

OLD WHITE

This colour will look white in almost any 'old' situation.

LIGHT GRAY

A stone colour, particularly successful with combined with Shaded White or Mouses Back.

MOUSES BACK

A quiet, neutral dark stone or drab colour.

WEVET

A delicate fresh white which is extremely versatile.

STRONG WHITE

A bright, clean white when used with dark colours. Or if used with light colours it becomes cool.

AMMONITE

The colour of fossils found on the Dorset coast.

CORNFORTH WHITE

In memory of John Cornforth, architectural historian and author of the landmark publication 'English Decoration in the 18th Century'.

PURBECK STONE

A stronger neutral which resembles the stone found in the Isle of Purbeck.

MOLES BREATH

The name Moles Breath speaks for itself – linking in with the fantastically popular Elephant's Breath but reflecting the beautiful colour of a mole’s coat.

STONY GROUND

One of our beige wallpaper ground colours.

FAWN

An often used colour in 18th and 19th century decorating for both walls and woodwork.

BONE

As woodwork for strong colours or to simulate stone when combined with Lime White.

FRENCH GRAY

As the name suggests, also much used in 19th century wallpapers.

HARDWICK WHITE

The colourway used to touch up old white limewash at Hardwick Hall.

LAMP ROOM GRAY

A match to the original white which had dirtied down due to the trimming of lamp wicks.

BLACKENED

Historically made with the addition of 'lamp black', a pigment made by collecting the residue from burnt lamp oil.

DIMPSE

A cool gray to complement Pavilion Gray and Blackened. The colour of twilight according to West Country dialect.

PAVILION GRAY

A lighter, less blue version of Lamp Room Gray, reminiscent of an elegant colour used in Sweden in the late 18th century under Gustav III.

MIZZLE

A soft blue grey reminiscent of a west country evening mist. The blue will become more intense when painted in a smaller room.

BLUE GRAY

A bluer version of French Gray. This colour will appear bluer in well lit rooms.

PIGEON

Based on late 18th and 19th century paint sections.

SKIMMING STONE

A highly versatile off-white, 'Skimming' refers to its original use as a 19th century skim colour.

ELEPHANTS BREATH

An intepretation of this famously named colour by John Fowler. Use as a colour in its own right, or as part of a 'stone' scheme.

DOVE TALE

Some see this colour as a grey while to others it appears to be warmer and more stony. Typical of the colours used by the Bright Young Things between the wars.

CHARLESTON GRAY

The Bloomsbury Group used this colour extensively, both in interior decoration and on canvas.

LONDON CLAY

A charming brown, which works well as a colour in its own right.

BRINJAL

This deep aubergine colour originated as a 19th century estate colour.

GREAT WHITE

A bright white but one which is neither 'yellow' nor 'cold'

MIDDLETON PINK

A lighter, more delicate version of Pink Ground.

CINDER ROSE

Contains no more than a hint of the yellow pigment found in many common pinks.

PINK GROUND

The lightest red of our wallpaper ground colours.

SETTING PLASTER

A definite pink in historical terms, this colour will reward those looking for a solid paint colour to reflect the colour of plaster.

DEAD SALMON

The name comes from a painting bill for the library at Kedleston of 1805, though in fact analysis suggests that this colour was far less pink.

CALAMINE

Colours like this one appeared regularly in country house anterooms and boudoirs from the 1870s on into Edwardian times.

NANCYS BLUSHES

Named after a mystery Nancy, this true pink holds real charm and is best contrasted either with All White or Black Blue.

RADICCHIO

A cleaner, less aged version of Eating Room Red. This is a strong red tempered by magenta.

RED EARTH

A paler version of Terre d'Egypte.

PICTURE GALLERY RED

Based on the Picture Gallery at Attingham Park.

INCARNADINE

A rich crimson red, similar to the red gloss paint used by the late David Hicks at Barons Court in the 1970s.

RECTORY RED

Vermillion, as in Blazer, red was often made cheaper by the addition of red lead which blackens with age, so changing the colour to Rectory Red.

EATING ROOM RED

A deep red, popular around the middle of the 19th century and made possible with the discovery of new pigments. It is related to red damask colourings.

BOOK ROOM RED

To do the work of Picture Gallery Red Eating Room Red but in smaller rooms.

TERRE DEGYPTE

Joas White ideally complements the strength of this terracotta red.

CHARLOTTES LOCKS

Highly dramatic and extremely fasionable especially when combined with Railings.

BLAZER

A bright vermillion red similar to the colour of the sports blazer worn at St. John's College, Cambridge.

PALE HOUND

For the effect of Hound Lemon when used in smaller rooms.

DAYROOM YELLOW

Popular in the late 20th century, this sunny yellow has its origins in the England of the 1820s. A typical Soanian or Regency colour.

YELLOW CAKE

A classic bright yellow named to reflect the revival of the ‘homemade’.

CITRON

A 19th century trade name for a strong fairly acid yellow.

YELLOW GROUND

One of our yellow wallpaper ground colours.

BABOUCHE

The brightness of this yellow will intensify any table

HOUND LEMON

This John Fowler colour is best used in well lit spaces.

HAY

A bright but not excessively 'hot' yellow. An early 19th century colour. Mid Tones Undercoat.

DORSET CREAM

A darker and more yellow version of Farrow's Cream.

SUDBURY YELLOW

An interpretation of John Fowler's wall colour for the staircase at Sudbury Hall, Derbyshire.

PRINT ROOM YELLOW

Farrow & Ball mixed this colour for an early restoration of an 18th century print room.

INDIA YELLOW

First available in England in the 18th century this pigment was produced by reducing the bright yellow urine of cows fed on a special diet of mango leaves.

TUNSGATE GREEN

A delicate pale yellowish green, this colour can be used with a clean white to maintain its clarity or against much darker colours to act as an interesting neutral.

GREEN GROUND

One of our wallpaper ground colours based on Cooking Apple Green.

COOKING APPLE GREEN

An old fashioned green made from common earth pigments.

BALL GREEN

An old fashioned distemper colour from the Farrow & Ball archives.

OLIVE

As used in early 18th century panel rooms. A true earth green.

STUDIO GREEN

The best very dark colours often appear black on colour cards and only show their colour when painted on larger areas.

CHURLISH GREEN

This yellow-green colour has been used decoratively for centuries, both on its own and as a ground beneath patterned wallpapers. Good contrast to Tanners Brown.

BREAKFAST ROOM GREEN

This colour is lively both by day and candlelight.

CALKE GREEN

This is a colour based directly on a cleaned version of the breakfast room at Calke Abbey.

CASTLE GRAY

First used on the exterior woodwork of a stone castle. A good period green for exterior use.

CARD ROOM GREEN

For those who think this colour too drab, try with Fawn.

GREEN SMOKE

An uncertain green/blue/grey colour popular in the second half of the 19th century.

VERT DE TERRE

This is reminiscent of the pigment green earth. Darker and cooler than Cooking Apple Green, yet lighter and less stony coloured than Stone White.

LICHEN

Quieter and subtler than Olive for well lit rooms.

TERESAS GREEN

Just lighter in tone than the popular Green Blue, this colour is also slightly warmer.

DIX BLUE

A cleaner version of Green Blue.

CHAPPELL GREEN

This colour will at times read green, at other times blue, depending on which colours are put with it.

ARSENIC

A green verdigris wallpaper ground colour

CABBAGE WHITE

A delightful clean colour that takes its name from the distinctive wings of the Cabbage White butterfly

PAVILION BLUE

For the effect of Pale Powder when used in smaller rooms.

PALE POWDER

A pale, less coloured version of Teresa's Green.

GREEN BLUE

This colour will at times read green, at other times blue, depending on which colours are put with it.

OVAL ROOM BLUE

A typical late 18th, early 19th century colour which appears time and again in historic schemes.

STONE BLUE

Indigo, as imported in the 18th century, came in lumps and hence was often known as 'stone blue

BORROWED LIGHT

A perfect bedroom light blue wall colour, though it can also be used as a complement to darker colours.

SKYLIGHT

A definite light blue, works with Parma Gray.

LIGHT BLUE

If you wish for a slightly light blue room this, rather than the more obviously blue blues, is the one to try.

PARMA GRAY

John Fowler's name and colour sample, though surely based on 1830's and 1840's schemes.

LULWORTH BLUE

A clean mid-tone Regency blue

COOKS BLUE

A match to the Cooks Blue described in the Farrow & Ball book Paint and Colour in Decoration.

BLUE GROUND

A blue wallpaper ground first used in our Damask collection.

ST GILES BLUE

A clean strong blue found in St Giles House at Wimborne St Giles

PITCH BLUE

A strong definite blue made warm by te addition of magenta.

DRAWING ROOM BLUE

A traditional salon blue, this colours clean hue is reminiscent of the pigment cobalt, used by artists and discerning decorators ever since its discovery in the 19th century.

STIFFKEY BLUE

Reminiscent of the extraordinary colour of the mud found at Stiffkey beach, Norfolk

HAGUE BLUE

A strong blue, reminiscent of Dutch external woodwork.

CALLUNA

A pretty heather colour

BRASSICA

An aged darker version of Calluna. This colour comes alive when combined with Calluna or Pelt.

PELT

Darker and less red than Brinjal, the perception of this colour will vary greatly depending on what other colours are used with it.

MANOR HOUSE GRAY

A traditional 18th century colour. A definite grey which also sits happily in contemporary interiors.

PLUMMETT

A lighter version of Down Pipe, imitating lead. Appropriate for interior as well as exterior use as often in Gothic architecture.

DOWN PIPE

A colour which imitates lead on exterior ironwork and helps lose plumbing against brickwork.

MAHOGANY

A very useful colour used to imitate mahogany both internally and externally and in place of graining.

TANNERS BROWN

Earth browns are the most timeless of decorative tones. Almost-black, equally suited to a loft apartment or historic house.

RAILINGS

A dark bronze colour, suitable for exterior ironwork in place of the usual black.

BLACK BLUE

This colour is definitely blue when painted in large areas. It is a blue version of Studio Green.

OFF BLACK

More flattering than jet black

PITCH BLACK

A truer, more intense black than Off-Black. Articles